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just did a dvd called rediscovering god in america which includes a section on washington. and i'm very intrigued with the extraordinary job that mount vernon has done in blding a remarkable education center, which i encourage everyone who comes to washington to go see. i would be very tempted someday to write aovel aut washington personally. i think washington's life is so amazing. he is such a personal odyssey in the development of freedom and he's so little understood, but it would be very daunting because washington is maybe the most complex american. i'd be pretty intimidated right now to try to explain his mind and explain how he operated. >> host: we have about 5 minutes left in our first hour of three with author, writer newt gingrich and also former speaker of the house and historian. we're spending three hours talking about his 14 books over his ceer so far. the next telephone call is from jacksonville, florida. you're on the air. >> caller: hello and thank you r c-span and congratulations to brian lamb on his presidential medal of freedom. mr. gingrich, you spoke earlier abou
% unemployment, a banking system that we thought was the pride of america that's now insolvent. the pride of the world in fact that's not basically insolvent except it was saved by government recently. i could go on and on. >> no, you can't. no, you can't. your reaching or five minutes, mr. madrick. [laughter] >> retail sales even recently kept going down so we are in trouble here. well what would you be told by the defense? you will be told what you have heard time and again. it wasn't capitalism, it wasn't on guided capitalism. it was government that told the berlin and investment bankers and commercial bankers to invest in risky securities that did not understand. it was government that told the banking system to set up a compensation system that rewarded people not to manage risk but to take too much risk. it is government that old people and all of these new mortgage brokers sell mortgages to people who could not possibly understand that even when you can't understand them because he will make a lot of money and i can go on and on. >> you can't go on and on. >> i could go on and on a
is extraordinary. >> america's allies sound a health care warming. -- warning. a prom meant republican raises eyebrows in yea. an ann coulter on our american panel. we've seen a lot of outrageous behavior from politicians at town halls this week. but this morning, texas representative sheila jackson lee took the disrespect to a new level, making a cell phone call while a cancer survivor asked a question. in this video, you can sele raising the phone to her ear and lowering it back down again. i think blatant disregard like that is a first, it didn't go unnoticed. take a look at how people in the audience reacted, this video has been circulating on youtube all day. >> [beep] >> seriously. really? come on. >> it's ok. >> if our conscience allow, congress' conscience allows them to -- do you think that -- sean: the congresswoman said she merely dialed president obama's health care hotline to get an answer for her constituents that sounds like she came really prepared. joining me to discuss all of this is author of "the culture of corruption" are which remains number one on "the new york times" l
apw were black because of blood. >> oliver: the only war america lpu could we have won? >> easily, easily. >> oliver: was itúqpw>=med fromy the start? >> you wanted an advisor who would tell him what he wanted to hear. in beirut, thanks.pw next news break, bottom of the t'r?ries with oliver north"q ÷y american infantryman can't be pushed, they have to be led from tzu front. this statue called follow me úwú/es tzu spirit of the the perilous business of war on the ground. on the gr north, this is war stories. coming to you from fort coming t georgia, home of the u.s. army infantry since 1918. during the 1960's and 70's, hundreds of thousands of young@@ soldiers honed their combat skills here. but american involvement in southeast asia began years before our first air and ground combat units arrived in 1965. early in the cold war against communists, the eisenhower administration spent billions fight against ho chi minh. supported himho chi minh. when he was our ally against the japanlá Ñ in world war ii. how did the united states find itself embroiled in vietnam fighting war th
of america, that is now insolvent. the pride of the world, in fact. it's not basically insolvent. except was saved by government recently. i could go on and on. >> no, you can't. no, you can't. you're reaching your five minutes. >> retail sales, even recently, kept going down. so we're in some trouble here. what will you be told by the defense? you will be told what you have heard time and again. that it wasn't capitalism. it wasn't unguided capitalism. it was government that did it. it was government that told those brilliant investment bankers and commercial bankers to invest in risky securities they did not understand. it was government who told the banking system to set up a compensation system that rewarded people not to manage risk but to take too much risk. it was government that told people, and all these new mortgage brokers, sell mortgages to people who could not possibly understand them, even when you can't understand them. because you'll make a lot of money on it. and i can go on and on, as you all know. >> no, you can't go on and on. you're using up your five minutes. >> you
is an extraordinary icahn for latin america. he came to providence in 1960's which is when that america literature first came to international prominence and it became possibly the most popular and and most no literature in the world. it appeared in 1966 and not appear until the mid-1960s and not doing terribly well did not become later what it was to become an 1967 which was gabriel garcia marquez. his 100 years of solitude it was almost as if it was predestined it would finally cap latin-american and not all it was famous before he published it the most famous at this point* was ulysses his novel became famous oliver north america perhaps after he hadn't written the first that was it. it would be a best seller and a great latin-american novel. he just knew it. him and his friends started to write articles when even marquez was only halfway through it. it did not happen very often but it did then. most latin american novels published 500 or 1,000 would be a very good printer run in the 1960's but all of a sudden one-man publishes 8,000 was the first run and repeated a couple of weeks later and re
. i emphasize that they may not be representative of america. their views have to be taken into account. >> there is some disagreement. >> how are we supposed trust you? is there an option to say no to this bill? >> it is not about health care reform or insurance reform. it is about government control. >> i charge you with usurping authority not granted to you as a u.s. senator. >greta: houston, texas a councilwoman answers a cell phone while a cancer survivor asks her a question. >> if you're conscious allows you, what are you doing for america -- >> seriously, really. come on. [unintelligible] >> do you think this is good for america? when does it stop? greta: tracy asked that question and joins us live. was there any explanation by the congresswoman by what happened? >> i did talk to her later, but not about her using the phone. what appeared to be happening was her staff was telling her that there were local political leaders coming to the meeting that he -- that she should talk to. greta: did she pick up the phone in the middle of your question? do you know who she was
the rewriting of america's restrictive immigration laws, drafted in the 1920s. he fought hard for the immigration and nationality act of 1965, signed by president lyndon johnson. and as america inches toward majority-minority status, with the descendants of european immigrants a declining share of the population, the face of today's america is the one kennedy's efforts helped create, for better... >> i think it is fair to say that senator kennedy was one of the architects of the america of the future. >> suarez: ... or for worse. >> the '65 act put american immigration on auto-pilot. >> suarez: by the time of the john kennedy administration, america had absorbed the huge ellis island generations of immigrants who poured in from europe from roughly 1880 to 1920. president kennedy, whose great- grandparents came to boston from ireland, supported scrapping the existing quota system that used 19th-century america's ethnic makeup as a template for letting in new arrivals, favoring europeans and effectively sealing off newcomers from the rest of the world. on the senate floor in 200
for president but you could run for president. you have a lot of fans here in america. >> i'm a big fan of your constitution. glenn: you are one of the only people that i have heard in a long time that says you are a fan of the constitution. it is not real popular here in america. >> i'm not popular among all the politicians. look, it will make you rich, free and independent, and it as driven value to thest of the world so that the world owes you something. glenn: here we have a congress and president not listening to the american people and about to deliver us the universal right to medicine that is just fantastic in your country. tell me about how great universal healthcare is. >> the most striking thing about it is that you are very often just sent back to the queue. you turn up with a complaint or ailment and you are told how about october of next year or whatever it is, and you are not able to supplement your treatment, your healthcare treatment with any private money of your own. people who had conditions and tried to buy drugs independently, they were told that the health treatment would
celebrities as he could to walk in the parades and attract recruit. the best known black man in america was jack johnson. he asked to join the service but he was an exile in paris and they wouldn't waive -- they did name a show after him. jack johnson was the biggest show the u.s. had. this is james reese, one of the best known men in harlem. the ahead of the music union. they wanted to hire musicians for society ball, they called him. some nights he would drive around harlem directing bands five or six different places. he would recruit from the streets of harlem. also the conductor of choice for a dance duo, vernon and irene castle. vernon castle was british citizen. and james muir traveled with them and got famous because of them. vernon castle joined the raf. they served in the 7th and 131st and the recruiting office was around the corner the cigar store. this is the tree of hope people touched for good luck, and they marched around with broomsticks on their shoulders instead of rifles. hayward used his wealthy friends to buy uniforms. they were porters and elevator operators and ar
more bureaucrats, to control more of america through politicians. that is a fundamentally different world. we believe we ought to develop american energy and american technology so america is able to keep the money at home, both for national security and for economic growth. they believe you ought to raise taxes massively on american energy, cripple the american economy and make sure you are dependent forever on countries like venezuela and saudi arabia, a fundamentally different model. we believe you ought to develop green technology. i wrote "contract with europe," but we also recognize there are 240 million vehicles in the current fleet that will require current technology fuels for the next generation. they believe we ought to make a magic switch overnight to technology that does not yet exist at a price we cannot imagine using things we don't know about from companies that have not yet been formed fundamentally. [ applause ] >> we believe the world is dangerous, borders ought to be controlled, homeland security ought to work and security ought to defend america and americans an
's all somehow inevitable and that the only way for america to get ahead is for places like elkhart to be left behind. you hear that argument sometime in washington. but i know and you know that the truth is exactly the opposite. i'm here because i believe our ability to recover and to prosper as a nation depends on what happens in communities just like this one. the battle for america's future will be fought and won in places like elkhart and detroit and goshen and pittsburgh, south bend, youngstown, in cities and towns across indiana and across the midwest and across the country that have been the backbone of america. it will be won by making places like elkhart what they once were and can be again, and that is centers of innovation and entrepreneurship and ingenuity and opportunity. the whirring engines of america. we can't afford to run the race at half strength or half speed. if we hope to lead this century like we did the last century, we have to create the conditions and opportunities for places like elkhart to succeed. we have to harness the potential, the innovative and cr
on the cnn express across america talking to you about your health coverage and what you want to see in reform. ali, what are they telling you? >> reporter: and i'm here in kansas city, missouri, with the cnn express. i've been hearing a lot from people across the country. we've started in georgia, went through tennessee, kentucky, illinois, missouri, and now into kansas and then into iowa. we're finding out what people are feeling about health care. the debate, as we've seen, has been heated in town hall meetings all over the country. when we stopped in paducah, kentucky, i had a very civilized, very normal conversation with some folks about their fears and hopes for health care reform, christine. have a listen to this. >> reporter: we are hearing different things from people wherever we're going but i haven't found too many people around here who are opposed to reforming health care. >> i'm for the idea but i don't think that congress and the president have done a good job of disseminating information. i'm just hearing a lot of talk. >> reporter: what about you? >> i think right no
yesterday with apologies to those folks watching on c-span, but the only moral contented people in america then left-wing commager's on blogs or left wing collars -- are left wing coallers on washington journal. three weeks ago, nancy pelosi was blocking legislation would prohibit the fairness doctrine. who is the lead role in the senate, not barbara boxer, the other one feinstein did mention it. they're blocking republican attempts to shut it down while pointing people t the fcc to throw it back in. we have to be vigilant >> thank you, i live in a snake pit called new jersey have the time. part of the problem is that in new jersey, we have three republican congressmen that voted for capt. trade. i, being a lifelong republican and conservative feel like it is time to pull the plug on these people. [applause] if they're going to be supporting barack obama and the democrats, we do not need them. but when i talk to other republican people, they say that if we get rid of one, we will get another one so that i am in a dilemma about that. we have a man that is running for governor who, one week
is now president of the united states of america. [applause] our senators taking over from republicans. [applause] our good friend donna edwards has banned elected to her first full term in the house of representatives with many, many more to come. [applause] i have to tell you as someone who works with netroots nation every year, we had to be ready for the alternative. we had to have our other agenda in place in case the other actions turned out otherwise. some of the panel's we had in place. "no, we didn't." food policy and the mccain era. advocating the canadian immigration process. [laughter] taking your message to the people, billboards and skywriting changed elections. rob emanuel. meet the supreme court's first supreme court justice, alberto gonzales. reforming the vice-presidential selection process, how to find the village with the biggest idiot. [laughter] [applause] on behalf of our board, i can't say enough about our tremendous staff that works year-round to put this conference together. raven brooks, karen colbern, we would not be here without you. [applause] we would not
of the rest of europe. welcome to "bbc worldews" broadcast to our viewers opbs in america also around the globe. cong up later for you, the rce of iran's fead be senged you militia. have an intervi with a former memr. anit's fewell to a pioer of roc music, the guitast les paul has died. hello. e u.s. governmt is making its view very clear. the man serving a lifesentence a jailf the bombing of a pa am jet should note releas early. he has ternal proste cancer. he could be freed next week on compasonate grounds. he served eightears of his sentence. the b correspondentllen little reported back othe saster in 1988. he has returnedo lockerbie now. >> t whole sky just lit up d it was le liquid fire starteto rain down on the car. >> like a atom bomb going off. it was a rrific mhroom of flames. >> i lost my broer-in-law, my sier-in-law. >> it was d winter, the longest ght of th yr. one ur into its flight. thpan am jumbo jet fell ou of the cd sky, the biggest mass murr in british history. he w sentenced to lif for plantinghe bomb i now likely to be releaseds early as next ek o compassionate gro
of air america and dana lohse affiliated with the st. louis tea party. dana, why so much anger, mistrust and misinformation out there? we wonder, has this whole thing devovled to the point where it is unproductive but potentially dangerous? >> i don't think it can be dangerous. congress is sfonsable for setting the tone. congress hasn't allowed for discourse for one of the most important pieces of legislation in american history that is what people are reacting to. they are tired of calling their legislator and leaving a message with an aide. we are seeing people who are flocking there because they have their elected official's ear and they want to express their conditions about the health care legislation. >> ron, what about the argument, this is not organized, but a grassroots movement and deeply concerned about health care. >> that is fine to get involved and it is good to show up at a town hall meeting and have a conversation. you have to have the conversation and have the discussion. many of these people, not all, many of these people are clearly showing up to shut the conversation
viewers on pbs in america also around the globe. coming up later for you, the force of iran's feared be seeinged you militia. we have an interview with a former member. and it's farewell to a pioneer of rock music, the guitarist les paul has died. hello. the u.s. government is making its view very clear. the man serving a life sentence in a jail of the bombing of a pan am jet should not be released early. he has terminal prostate cancer. he could be freed next week on compassionate grounds. he served eight years of his sentence. the bbc correspondent allen little reported back on the disaster in 1988. he has returned to lockerbie now. >> the whole sky just lit up and it was like liquid fire started to rain down on the car. >> like an atom bomb going off. it was a terrific mushroom of flames. >> i lost my brother-in-law, my sister-in-law. >> it was mid winter, the longest night of the year. one hour into its flight. the pan am jumbo jet fell out of the cold sky, the biggest mass murder in british history. he was sentenced to life for planting the bomb is now likely to be released as e
for "newsweek" and chris of it, the deputy chief editor of the france press america wire service. john, let's start with you. critics of the review are sort of dismissing it already out of hand saying it is merely a budget drill and something that will define major budget cuts that will come down the pipe. is that fair? because there are hints we will get strategy out of this. aren't we? >> yes. i think the criticism is that it should be a budget drill. strategy review if it's untethered to the resources. i think it's likely to be more interesting than the last couple. because it does seem to be grappling with two separate problems. on two separate time frames. and the big problem out is the way is a european competitor, china that nobody talks about that. if so what do you do? how do you prepare? out there is the biggy. in the mean time there are the future of these mete wars. like iraq, afghanistan. and the future of what we call the global commons like piracy. which requires. >> and -- >> add stuff but my sense is that the two drivers in terms of project and force numbers are the ones i
the money comes from. >> federal aid? >> how is c-span funded? america's cable companies created c-span is that public service, a private business initiative -- no government mandate, no government money. . >> the main opposition party has a shadow team or shadow cabinet who breach the main government ministers. you haven't foreign secretary and in the shadow foreign secretary in the conservative opposition. it is his job to challenge him, question the foreign secretary, and potentially would hold the position of foreign secretary if he were elected in the next general election. >> most of the recent polls show the conservative party with a 15% lead. what role is foreign policy playing in british politics right now? >> foreign-policy has been high on the agenda because of their commitment currently in afghanistan, and before that, in iraq. the positions of the two main parties have not been hugely different. on both sides of the political divide, what you are going to see is a much greater degree of caution about taking on major overseas military ahead. you are going to see pressur
questions. they may not be representative of america, but they are significant, and their views have to be taken into account. >> how are we supposed to trust you? i know that is a tough question, but i will make it easy. is there an option to say no to this bill? because it does not seem like you have said anything today. >> it is really not about health-care reform or about insurance reform. it is about government control. >> senator cardin, authority not given to you as a senator. greta: houston, texas, the congresswoman holds a town hall and actually answers herself on as a cancer survivor asks her a question. -- answers to cell phone as a cancer survivor after a question. -- answers her cell phone as a cancer survivor asks her a question. >> seriously. really, i mean, come on. >> you think this is good for america? when does it stop? greta: tracy miller asked that question, and she joins us. tracy, that video looks absolutely horrible. was there any explanation by the congressman about why that happened? >> i did talk to her later, but not about using the phone. her staff or hey
kennedy, a man who fought passionately and pragmatically in the senate. >> he challenged our america, and our teddy changed america. >> people have called teddy and me the odd couple, which was certainly true. >> two of senator kennedy's closest friends, warren hatch of utah and christopher dodd of connecticut, share their personal memories. plus senator maria wall of washington on the post-kennedy debate for office. and in our american dispatch, the kennedy connection to boston sports dynasty. i talked to the president and ceo of the red sox, larry laquino. four years now since hurricane katrina devastated the gulf coast. senator andrews gets the last word. "state of the union" report for sunday, august 30. >>> a man who never stopped trying to right wrongs and someone who wasn't perfect but believed in redemption. just a few of the sentiments expressed at the funeral of senator edward kennedy in boston yesterday. president obama led the eulogy in saying goodbye at arlington cemetary. here is a reflection on senator kennedy's life, oren hatch of utah and senator christopher dodd. se
in america because that was right up to the time i finished writing the book. so i think anybody that reads inside the beltway i see that you have a paperback copy, it's on paperback now, will find a lot of humor is true tales that have been told inside washington that they will not have read anywhere else and just like "weed man" i picked out the finest stories like with the stored marijuana in the basements of churches and got more room on the island with 40,000 pounds of wheat and build a house out of the bales and i try to bring some humor to the beat which is what i've done. >> host: john, thank you very much. i've enjoyed this discussion and urge the few words to take a fresh look at marijuana smuggling and read "weed man." >> guest: thank you. i appreciate that very much. .. >> the soviet army and task forces in 1991 since published in russia in his book the icebreaker and in this book he argues a widely accepted theory regarding the origins of world war ii were erroneous. in his new book, it "the chief culprit" stalin's grand design to start world war ii" dr. suvorov furthers his id
foundation dedicated to promoting fiscal responsibility and addressing key economic challenges facing america's future. good evening, i'm martin savidge. >>> the war in afghanistan. and tonight we want to take a deeper look at that conflict there from several perspectives you might not have seen, even though president obama has ordered 21,000 additional troops to afghanistan, america's military commanders are now saying that may not be enough to fight effectively against the taliban. yesterday, the chairman of the joint chiefs said the situation is serious. and it is deteriorating. that assessment came just days after afghanistan's presidential election, which continues to generate widespread allegations of fraud and intimidation as votes are counted. for americans, voting freely and without pressure is all but taken for granted, that is not the case if afghanistan. and to help you understand that, in tonight's "lead focus" we want to give you a firstland look what the some afghans faced just for voting in a remarkable piece of reporting of james base of al jazeera english. >> reporter: the t
is the biotech company up by around 2% and that's after analysts at bank of america and merrill lynch upgraded that stock to overweight from underweight and increased the company's price starting. we are watching ubs. that stock is lower, in line with the rest of the financials here in zurich. we are expecting the deal with the u.s. to be signed in washington later on today. that's when we may get some more details out on the settlement and sales including how many client names will be handed over to the u.s. authorities. there's a possibility of when the swiss government will sell its stake in ubs. ubs authorities have said they're preparing criminal investigations into 150 ubs clients in the u.s. and the wall street journal is reporting that up to 10 swiss and european banks among them. chris swiss and julius bear were identified in the ubs tax probe. that's after ubs clients in the u.s. have come forward and disclosed their ubs accounts, also other foreign accounts and they have said that they're with either credit suisse or other banks. but that doesn't necessarily mean that those banks wi
, to america. how would you feel after you get it? two people who just got the vaccine yesterday are joining us next. steve: he cannot stay out of the spotlight. disgraced illinois governor blagojevich channeling elvis. >> ♪ kiss me once. (announcer) this is nine generations of the world's most revered luxury sedan. this is a history of over 50,000 crash-tested cars... this is the world record for longevity and endurance. and one of the most technologically advanced automobiles on the planet. this is the 9th generation e-class. this is mercedes-benz. ♪ bicycle, what are we waiting for? the flowers are blooming. the air is sweet. and zyrtec® starts... relieving my allergies... 2 hours faster than claritin®. my worst symptoms feel better, indoors and outdoors. with zyrtec®, the fastest... 24-hour allergy medicine, i promise not to wait as long to go for our ride. zyrtec® works fast, so i can love the air™. >> [1brian: nancy pelosi calling average americans to show up at the town hall meetings un- american. the white house tells senators, if you get it, we will punch back twice as hard.
pretty much 100% control of all information dissemination in america. now you have these tiny little breaches in the wall of sound with talk radio and the internet so what they want to do? shut them down. >> host: early one morning just been published you were being interviewed by howard smith on pbs and he said you talk about victims and dictum put in america but the more i listen to you i think that you are the one claiming victimhood, that you are the victim of the left-wing conspiracy and he held out his arms and said you should have across. what is howard smith struggling with? [laughter] .. how is chris werner going to get out there and heather macdonald? we have so many fantastic writers in new york, some and fantastic right wing writers and you are buying your head against the wall just to get attention for a book in even a best-selling book, even your seventh best-selling book when it's that hard for me to get on tv what does that say about the conservatives people love norma? >> host: others have said you try to be funny and he called a sophomoric sort of simplistic view of
sheets like this in america they are call -- seats like this in america it is called a picnic bench. there is not a picture of a person the size of people. you just sit there if you want a little extra room. >> greg: i was going i don't see why this is a stickma but i can't read brazilian so i didn't even know what the insult was. >> i think they speak french there. >> greg: interesting. bill, you are young and skin any. what i find a problem here is the people that set these rules are young and skin any and too stupid to it realize that at some point they will get old and fat. >> actually i'm not that young and i do have shingles. >> that is a terrible joke. >> that is why i'm peaked right now. brazil is following my lead. every day i give up my seat to obese people to make room for them on the subways. granted they are pregnant but obese is obese. >> greg: the u.s. shouldn't adopt similar policies. >> and they shouldn't paint the chair blue. you're right. why not just have a long bench. why should everyone have an individual seat when you just sort of sitting there. >> greg: with
with the great majority of that funding devoted to iraq and afghanistan. over that period, america's reliance on contractors has grown to unprecedented proportions, to support logistics, security and reconstruction efforts related to those operations. more than 240,000 contract employees, about 80% of them foreign nationals work in iraq and afghanistan at one time to support the department of defense. additional contractor employees support the department of state and the u.s. agency for international development. contractor employees outnumber u.s. military personnel in both theaters. they have a critical mission and according to reports from the military in theater, they are doing an exceptionally good job providing security, transportation, meals, laundry and other services. the questions raised today in no way detract from the overwhelming good opinions of contractors' support for u.s. missions or obscure the fact that nearly 1,400 contract contract employees have died on duty in. the government's concerns about the ability to evaluate the costs of contractor services and provide good ste
inspired our america. robert kennedy challenged our america. and our teddy changed america. >> people called teddy and me the odd couple, which was certainly true. >> two of senator kennedy's closest friends, orrin hatch of utah and christopher dodd of connecticut share their personal memories. >>> plus senator maria cantwell of washington on the post-kennedy health care debate in the congress. and my exclusive interview with the late senator's nephew robert f. kennedy jr. and in our american dispatch, the kennedy connection to boston's sports dynasty. i talk to the president and ceo of the red sox. four years now since hurricane katrina devastated the gulf coast. louisiana senator mary landrieu gets the last word. "the state of the union" report for sunday august 30th. a champion for those who had none. a man who never stopped trying to right wrongs. someone who wasn't perfect but believed in redemption. just a few of the sentiments expressed at the funeral yesterday. president obama led the nation in saying good-bye to the 77-year-old senator who was laid to rest near his brothers j
was the biggest, what was your biggest surprise in america? he turned to me and said i can't believe you eagen your cars. [laughter] we got a big chocolate of this because in france eating is a sacrament. we yvgeny short lanchester have fresh bread, good wine and time enough to enjoy it but it is a very different thing than driving down the highway with the quarter pounder and fries in your lap, a soft drink large enough to have an undertow sloshing around in the cup holder, your fingers between bites so you don't get greece on the wheel. i am kidding of course a we don't really eat this way, do we? get ready to cringe. the american culinary institute did a study that found among 18 to 50-year-old americans, roughly one-fifth of paul eating takes place in the car. significant percentage of the rest takes place in front of the tv. if that is the way most of my fellow americans want to take their meals, of course i would not call the meals as much as eating occasions but if that is how we choose to take our nutritional input every day all i can say is the bhola fronts because, i am going to read
america. robert kennedy challenged our america. and our teddy changed america. >> people have called teddy and me the odd couple. which was certainly true. >> two of senator kennedy's closest friend, orrin hatch of utah, and christopher dodd of connecticut share their personal memories. plus, senator maria cantwell of washington on the post kennedy health care debate in congress. and exclusive interview with robert f. kennedy, jr. and in our "american dispatch", the kennedy connection to boston sports dynasty. i talk to the president and ceo, larry luccino. four years now since hurricane katrina devastated the gulf coast. mary landrieu gets the last word. >>> a champion for those who had none. a man who never stopped trying to right wrongs. and someone who wasn't perfect but believed in redemption. just a few of the sentiments expressed at the funeral of senator edward kennedy in boston yesterday. president obama led the nation in saying good-bye to the 77-year-old senator laid to rest by brothers john and robert. hear the reflections on the senator's life and work, senator orrin hatch of
in places of america that are named after kosciuszko. and those of you that thought this would be a discussion about kosciuszko mustard that takes place at your local deli every day. [laughter] know, this is about thaddeus kosciuszko, the peasant prints in the age of revelation. kosciuszko was a prince of tolerance to stop for the disenfranchisement of all religions and genders he was probably the greatest humanitarian of his era. in 1817 when the news of his death and exile in switzerland spread through europe funeral masses were held in catholic, lutheran and calvinist churches. even the jewish temples and muslim mosques helped services where the worshipers prayed for god to take kosciuszko's sold to heaven. think about it, europe have gone through decades ethnic and religious strife see it everybody paid for his soul. .. kosciuszko's birth was augustus and he was elected thanks to the love of his lover, catherine the great of russia. russia started to have more and more of an impact on polish society at this time so a lot of poles were trying to figure out ways to help drive
he is on the right path. this is the most tragic moment we have had in the history of america, since the great depression and world war ii, and i want to be part of the team of leadership, accountable leadership leadership that says, these are the facts, and that is how you have to see it. but i want our children to be all they can be in their educational opportunity, because we need them to lead america again. health care reform is an absolute requirement. the dividend we get from it in the navy is what you see in how we accomplished our jobs. america has to have that. in our economy, it is what it is about. entrepreneurialship should be the norm, not the exception. to have all the answers? absolutely not. experience? yes, i dealt with sailors on a nuclear ship, but the average age was 19. i just want pennsylvania to have leadership in the future that is working for them, and i promised to do that every day. thank you. [applause] >> thank you. >> i would love to follow up, thank you. [applause] >> a thank you. thank you to both candidates, to everyone who put this together. >> penns
in america. so i would actually make this more small business-friendly than even the blue dogs did. if it was up to me, i'd say anybody with a payroll of less than million dollars or anybody with a number of employees less than 50 is exempt from the mandate. now we're going to take the flier. i see i only have a few minutes left. i'm just -- i have -- since i wrote about this in the book, i feel some -- i think it's okay for me to say this. i'm not pushing this. but it was part of my platform in 2004. [laughter] >> it's slightly revised. [applause] >> if i were going to do this, i actually argue in the book that we really don't need a mandate and i don't think mandates are going to be very popular. because mandating anything with the american people is never very popular which is why it makes me mad while the republicans think about sticking us with the mandates that we have today. [applause] >> but if i could do this any way i wanted to, this is a flier, i'm not lobbying for this. all i care about is the public option. i would give everybody under 25 or 30 medicaid for free. and i
, but there is a debt to pay for students at west point. the top-ranked school in the whole forbes list of america's best colleges. the u.s. military academy topped all other elite schools including princeton, the california institute of technology, williams college, and way down there at number five, harvard. the school has a spectacularly beautiful campus on the banks of the hudson river. that was not one of the factors taken into account. forbes ranks schools based on the graduation rate, the success, the average debt at graduation. for many of the young men and women who attend the academy, the debt will be paid on the battlefields. a senior cadets are getting ready to become leaders inside those war zones. laura ingle has a look at west point with a look at their training. number one university in all of america. >> that is right. their training comes under the direction of the superintendent, the first commander of the u.s. invasion of afghanistan after 9/11. the new training involves simulated scenarios with arabic speaking actors all designed to put pressure on. for west point cadet jonath
and happiness belongs to america. that if i am a woman from it all i do not like choice. i enjoy being a muslim woman does not pursue happiness and these were also issues that i responded to when i was writing. >> host: in one of the reviews of the book, they made the argument that perhaps your mother ayyad delusion about herself, about the life she created, the illusion that you got sucked into it in many different ways and became a part of it is a metaphor for the illusion of iran, a country that has an image of itself and what it wishes to be and thinks it is deserving to be bought is constantly underperforming. is that what you had in mind? >> guest: i knew that in writing this book i was also responding to different feelings and emotions about iran about the concept what home is or was. but people who read the book always had insight that you necessarily did not have. i do think that we have an illusion of the past and if like my mother we become frozen and do not have a critical and dynamic conversation with the past we will never leave that past. we can change regimes every ten years and
that united america. after sputnik, we went to pick the moon. ronald reagan rally in the country to end communism. you can think of george bush's cry in 2001 that we would defeat -- lead a global war on terrorism and extremism. it is interesting, the last one, the war on terrorism seems to have lost some of that national feeling. when you do polling, you see people not as invested in the success of afghanistan and iraq and other places where we are fighting were secretly, such as the horn of africa. yet in our strategic interest, clearly fighting terrorism will remain the big issue. he what is the next big national issue? what can president obama defined as the national agenda? he tried very much to make health care that. in the last press conference he said it is intimately tied to your own personal future as an american. but we have not seen americans rally around that idea yet as a national cause. this is something president obama and his allies will try to do. he will try to cast the health care debate as important as going to the moon or defeating communism or terrorism you will se
america never die. i love you, dad. and you will always live in my heart forever. [applause] [applause] >> your eminence, vicki, cara, edward, patrick, currin, caroline, members of the kennedy family, distinguished guests, and fellow citizens,. todacitizens, today we say goodbye to the youngest child of rose and joseph kenne kennedy. the world will long remember their son edward as the heir to a weighty legacy. a champion for those who had none. the soul of the democratic party and the lion of the united states senate. a man who graces nearly 1,000 laws, who's penned more than 300 laws himself. but those of us who loved him and ache with his passing know ted kennedy by the other titles he held: father, brother, husband, grandfather, uncle teddy, or, as he was often known to his younger nieces and nephews, the grand fromage, or the big cheese. [laughter] i, like so many others in the city where he worked for nearly half a century, knew him as a colleague, a mentor, and, above all, as a friend. ted kennedy was the baby of the family who became its patriarch, the restless dreamer who beca
the prospect of a woman of puerto rican heritage serving on the supreme court says a lot about america. says a lot about america. >> judge sotomayor has achieved academic and professional success, and i alaud her -- applaud her public service. but in the end her record creates too many conflicts with fundamental principles about the judiciary in which i deeply believe. i do not have -- it did not have to be this way. president obama could have taken a very positive step for our country by choosing a his tannic -- hispanic nominee whom all senators could support. president obama could have done so, and i regret he did not. i commend the ranking member of the judiciary committee senators leahy and sessions for conducting a fair and thorough confirmation hearing. judge sotomayor herself said the hearing was as gracious and fair as she could have asked for. i evaluate judicial nominees by focusing on qualifications which include not only legal experience, but more importantly judicial philosophy. judge sotomayor's approach to judging is more important to me than her resumÉ. i ask consent to put
>>> good morning, america. breaking news, as former president bill clinton arrives in north korea. a high-stakes missionoe two, american journalists facing 12 years and hard labor. >>> running on empty. is this the last day to turn that clunker into cash? will the program stall out in the senate? >>> ten seconds of terror. passengers tell us about the moment their packed jetliner dropped like a stone. we answer your questions about turbulence. >>> as children head back to school, we have the swine flu survival kit. >>> and does air conditioning turn you into a popsicle? is this a female thing? we take a stand on our hot is this a female thing? we take a stand on our hot topics this morning. captions paifor by abc, inc. >>> and good morning, america. i'm diane sawyer, with chris cuomo. robin is on assignment, on this august 4th, 2009. and everyone has been thinking all along, who could sweep into north korea? who could gain the american journalists? >> the answer is presidentill clinton. he landed in the capital today. >> it's an extraordinary mission, as you say, because of the hi
and addressing keyconomic challees facing america's future. od eveni, i'm martin sadge. >>> the wain afghanistan. d tonight we want to ta a deeper look at thatonflict there from several rspectives you might not havseen, even though president obama has ordered 21,000 aitional troops to afghanist, america's military commanders are now ying that may not be enough to fight eectively against the taliba sterday, the cirman of the joint chiefs sa the situation is serious. and it deterrating. that assessment came st days ter afghastan's presidential election, whic continues to generate widespread allegations of fraud and intimidation as votes are counted for americans, voting freely and without pressures all but taken for granted, that is not the case if afghanisn. and toelp you unrstand tht, in tonight's "lead fos" we want to gi you a firstland look what e someafghans faced just for voting in remarkable piece of reporting of james ba al jazeera englis >> reporter: t taliban said th'd find the people who defied their ords and took part in the election. they are livinup to their word these ctures showe
more innocent lives in the future. >> america says that the insurgents trying to topple the somali government are linked to al qaeda. they want to impose strict islamic law across somalia, and they have the government pinned into a small corner of the capital, mogadishu. the war appears to be attracting support from extremists. several young men were arrested, accused of links to the terror group. under the clinton presidency, american troops tried to intervene in somalia. when helicopters were shot down and soldiers killed in the black hawk down incident, america pulled out. reluctant to send troops, the americans are backing somali forces loyal to the transition government, with the aim of preventing hard-line islamist forces from seeking power. in nairobi, hillary clinton met the president with a clear message. we are with you, and we will help you to stay in power. there were promises of training and weapons. >> if they want a haven in somalia, it would attract al qaeda and other terror groups and be a threat to the united states. >> this was a very public show of support for p
. i don't quite get that but they do. america is a conservative company with a small c in this way. they all say they want change but they don't want quite as much as they think they want when they get in the ballot box. and so you can't change the system and push everybody in a certain way they don't want to go. so in 2004 i said, you know, let's keep the employer-based system is because i think you need to give the american people the choice and if that's what they want, let them choose that. that's why obama's bill -- i'm such a fan of obama's bill. that's howard dean's version of healthcare, 2004. insure everybody under 30. let everybody else buy into medicare or keep their private insurance if you want. now here's what i like obama's bill. it gets back to choice. we have failed to insure people in this country not just because the insurance companies spend a lot of money with harry and lewis who have endorsed health insurance now. we failed because we tried to make the american people do something they didn't want to do. 80% of the people in this country have insurance. of tho
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